INSTALLATION

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INSTALLING YOUR MUDCONTROL SLABS

Installing the slabs is a simple process and we explain the best practices below.  Whether you are looking to install onto hard ground in the summer or sloppy, winter mud, the ingenious tab system will have your hard-standing in place in no time.  

 

TOP TIP!!! Take time to work out your layout before you start - see Kerry's TOP LAYOUT TIPS below!

Looking to install your slabs on to thick, boot-sucking mud?  Don't miss a customer's genius solution video at the bottom of the page!

READY? Let's get started.....

PREPARATION

Level the ground by flattening bumps, removing rocks and filling holes. Lay down the first row of Mudcontrol slabs across the full length of the area to be covered.

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FITTING AND CUTTING

The second row of slabs should be staggered against the first by using a half grid at the beginning. Slabs can be easily cut with a saw.  

 

Mudcontrol slabs are easily cut with a hand saw or circular saw.  When using any power tool, please follow the power tool manufacturer’s recommended best practice. 

DON'T MISS KERRY'S TOP TIPS ABOUT LAYOUTS BELOW!

LAYING

When laying Mudcontrol slabs, a crowbar or shovel can give helpful leverage - but do not apply too much force. The slabs should fit loosely together to avoid tensions during hot or cold weather.

 

Lay down the second row of slabs after the first row has been done. Remember to leave a 1/4” (0.5 cm) expansion gap. Our Mudcontrol slabs make it easy to cover even large areas relatively quickly. Although the grids adapt well to uneven ground, level ground gets the best results. 

FITTING TIPS

It is best to cover exposed locating tabs to avoid damage from movement over the leading edge, this can be done with soil, sand or a similar medium.

 

A substrate like sand can be used to level the slabs out. Even after installation, substrate can fill gaps and dips by using a leverage action - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjpZ_0XiyvA

We recommend adding AT LEAST 1 bulk bag of sand (quarried sharp sand is our preference) per pallet of slabs, more if you want it to be deep enough for rolling, lying down, and playing on. It’s money well spent. Sharp sand won’t wash away as quickly as fine/soft sand, as the particles are rougher and bigger/heavier.

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FINISHING

Once the slabs have been laid out, cover with sand or another water-permeable material.  If you are using the slabs for livestock use, please use washed fine/soft sand or QUARRIED SHARP SAND - visit our SAND INFORMATION page for more info.  

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REMOVING AND RE-LAYING THE SLABS

Care should be taken when lifting the slabs for re-use, by far the best way to do this is by lifting the leading edge by about 15cm (6 inches) one row at-a-time and pull the lifted row away from the connecting row horizontally, lifting the slabs by more than 15 degrees can cause undue stress on the locating tabs and cause them to break, which will not generally be covered by the manufacturer’s warranty.

TOP LAYOUT TIPS

Firstly, it is strongly recommended that you stagger the slabs like bricks, this makes the whole area stronger and more stable (because you don’t have 4 corners meeting at 1 point.)

If you are ever intending to add more slabs to the area, then it’s really important to lay the first area so that in future you will be adding on to the straight edge A and not the staggered edge B.

Like this:

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Like this:

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This is because connecting new slabs into more than one side of bedded-in slabs is absolutely impossible, you would need to lift the whole area and start again (because you need to move one of the existing slabs slightly to let the new one into the corner, and that’s not possible when they’re bedded in.)

 

For pathways wider than 1 slab, it’s important to stagger the slabs against the direction of travel, as below:

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Or, if you don’t mind cutting slabs (with a hand saw or a bench or skill saw) then this is ideal:

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If you lay two parallel rows of slabs, then in certain circumstances (such as on bottomless clay soil) the horses continually walking down the middle line can cause it to gradually sink a bit and the slabs to tilt and ‘unzip’ along the straight middle joint.


Staggering the slabs helps to prevent this movement.

 

The slabs all interlink and help to stabilise each other, so square or rectangular areas will be more stable than oddly shaped areas with outlying slabs only joined on one or two sides to the rest (those will be more likely to move under a very heavy load if the ground underneath is saturated, for example.)

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If you don’t want to use sand around hay feeders, then holey rubber grass mats work very well. We’ve been trialling these for about 9 months with success (with 3 big mares on them 24/7).

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The sand topping is really important and makes a big difference. It solidifies the area, filling in any voids under the slabs, and helps the drainage, and gives extra gritty grip when the animals are getting used to the new surface. 

We recommend adding AT LEAST 1 bulk bag of sand (quarried sharp sand is our preference) per pallet of slabs, more if you want it to be deep enough for rolling, lying down, and playing on. It’s money well spent. Sharp sand won’t wash away as quickly as fine/soft sand, as the particles are rougher and bigger/heavier.

INSTALLING IN THICK MUD...?

 

MUDCONTROL - BELIEVE THE HYPE

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